On December 1, 2017, Professor Chunrye Kim gave a talk on "The Impact of Perceived Childhood Victimization and Patriarchal Gender Ideology on Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) Victimization among Korean Immigrant Women in the USA" at KCS (Korean Community Services) in Bayside, Queens. Approximately 20 people attended this presentation, which was RCKC's final seminar of 2017.

Kim is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. She earned her Ph.D. at John Jay College of Criminal Justice/Graduate Center of CUNY, and her primary research interests are victimology, domestic violence, and crime against vulnerable populations such as immigrants, children, and sex trafficking victims. Her work has been published in peer-reviewed journals including Child Abuse and Neglect, Journal of Family Violence, Sociological Forum, and Sociological Perspectives.

Professor Kim's talk examined the link between childhood physical and sexual victimization experiences and adulthood intimate partner violence among Korean immigrant women in the United States. As Korean immigrants often use physical punishment to discipline their children, and reporting sexual abuse is discouraged due to social stigma, cultural factors such as patriarchal values related to childhood victimization and intimate partner violence were also examined. The findings of this study reveal that IPV victims, compared with non-victims, experienced higher childhood victimization rates.


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